Clean Coal Test Plant Coming To Gillette

Clean Coal Test Plant Coming To Gillette

(Gillette, Wyo.) A new clean coal technology is heading towards its next big developmental step right here in Gillette. Clean Coal Technologies announced this week their intention to move a test plant from Oklahoma to the Gillette area sometime next month. “This is really good news,” said Energy Capital Economic Development CEO Phil Christopherson. Christopherson said Energy Capital has been helping the company facilitate the move for the past year. Cleaner The technology being tested converts raw coal into a cleaner-burning, more efficient fuel that burns hotter. The company’s end product reduces about 90 percent of chemical pollutants from the coal emissions. It began running coal through its test facility in Oklahoma in Dec. 2015. “The eyes of the coal and power industries are focused on our plant in Oklahoma, and we are confident that after all these years we are about to deliver an extraordinary technology to the market,” Clean Coal Technologies President and CEO Robin Eves said in a press release when the Oklahoma test facility began running coal. The company signed a memorandum of understanding last week with the University of Wyoming to help develop the technology towards the goal of commercializing the end product. Richard Horner, director special projects and emerging technology within the School of Energy Resources, said the technology does not impact carbon dioxide emissions to any meaningful degree. It does produce a coal product that burns much more efficiently than raw coal, which would have a marginal reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, Horner said, but the products value is the other environmental improvements it provides. “We’re producing a solid coal product that...

Coal test plant coming to Wyoming in November

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — A company that is developing a process to produce cleaner burning coal plans to begin work next month on establishing a test plant in northeast Wyoming, a company official said. Robin Eves, CEO of Clean Coal Technologies Inc., said his company is close to starting the commercial designs of the coal refining process it has been working on for more than a decade. Along with producing more energy than untreated coal, the refined coal product also produces fewer harmful emissions when burned, including carbon dioxide, the company said. The company will use coal from the Powder River Basin in northeast Wyoming in the new test plant. A location of the test plant will be announced soon, Eves told the Gillette News Record in an email. Through CCTI’s proprietary process, coal is treated in a way that extracts much of its moisture, which makes it lighter. While dehydrating coal isn’t a new idea, being able to do it in a way that the coal remains stable is, said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology with the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources. “It’s one thing taking the moisture out of coal, but if you do not consume that de-watered coal pretty quickly, you have spontaneous combustion problems,” Horner said. “What CCTI has done, which makes it intriguing, is that they’ve taken volatiles out of the coal together with the water, which improves the BTU value. Then, they’re taking those volatiles and spraying it back on the coal, which stabilizes it. That’s quite original.” Horner said that UW receives proposals for about three...

Coal test plant coming to PRB in Nov.

CEO says coal process ‘seriously needs to go to the next level’ After more than a decade of research and testing and about $20 million spent, Clean Coal Technologies Inc. is close to entering the final stages of developing a refining process company executives say could be the next big thing for thermal coal. “We are very close to starting the commercial designs and already have two licenses and will be seeking to sell further licenses over the next few months to the consumer nations,” said Clean Coal President and CEO Robin Eves about how close CCTI is to bringing its process to market, using Powder River Basin coal. “We hope to have the first commercial module producing (treated) PRB coal for export within 18 months.” Part of that process includes moving the company’s test plant from Oklahoma to a soon-to-be-announced location in the Gillette area, which will happen sometime next month, Eves said. “We will commence the move in November and will be making an announcement about the location shortly,” he said in an email to the News Record. “There are two short-listed.” Through CCTI’s proprietary process, coal is treated in a way that extracts much of its moisture, which makes it lighter. On tests using coal from the PRB, it’s also been found to reduce harmful emissions when burned and to produce more energy. While dehydrating coal isn’t a new idea, being able to do it in a way that the coal remains stable is, said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology with the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources. That’s why UW...

UW Partners With New York-Based Clean Coal Firm

After about an eight-month process of discussion and negotiation, the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources solidified a relationship with a New York-based clean-coal company this week. Clean Coal Technologies Incorporated, or CCTI, has developed technologies focused on making coal cleaner. UW hopes to work with them to help develop their products and make them more commercially viable. CCTI has several patented technologies, including one called Pristine-M that works to reduce the moisture content of coal, allowing for more volatile compounds to be added. By increasing the BTU, the traditional unit of measuring heat, CCTI is allowing the coal to burn more efficiently. The company hopes to use this technology to make typical coal more attractive to international markets. Aiden Neary, COO, CFO, and Director of CCTI, said UW offers many new opportunities for them — especially in terms of research and development. For instance, “looking at ways of improving the efficiency of our technology, looking at ideas regarding the products that you can derive from coal using our technology.” UW also provides connections with foreign markets, like Japan and Taiwan, while at the same time taking advantage of Wyoming’s Powder River Basin coal. “We’re looking to actually use our technology for beneficiating Powder River Basin coal to the point where it will actually be more attractive on the global stage from an export perspective into places like India, Japan, and Taiwan,” Neary said. CCTI also has a relationship with Wyoming New Energy, which is planning to build a two million ton coal mine in the Powder River Basin. CCTI plans to begin building a commercial facility in...

CCTC making strides forward with coal beneficiation technology

Coal Technologies, Inc., a clean-energy company using patented technology to convert run of mine coal into a cleaner burning and more efficient fuel, has signed an MoU with the School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming. The focus of the MoU is to further develop the performance and commercial potential of CCTI’s groundbreaking coal beneficiation technology. “Developing this important technical relationship with the School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming is a very significant and deliberate step for our company and will allow us to confidently further develop the wide-ranging potential and prospects for our patented and proven coal beneficiation technologies” said CEO Robin Eves. “The University – through its Carbon Engineering Initiative — is sharply focused on advantaging and maximising the potential of Wyoming mineral resources especially coal, both domestically and overseas, and our technology fits very well in Wyoming actualising their strategies,” added Eves. “With one of CCTI’s top priorities being to beneficiate Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, the synergies achievable from joining hands with the School of Energy Resources are compelling for us.” Richard Horner, Director Special Projects and Emerging Technology, within the School of Energy Resources, said: “The CCTI technology is proven at pre-commercial scale in the field and is a prime technology for us to investigate and support its development. We view the CCTI technology as an exciting and serious candidate that might be deployed to improve the competitiveness of Wyoming coal in existing markets and to support the development of new market opportunities too.” Horner added: “There are proprietary features of the CCTI technology which have scope to be incorporated into our ‘coal...