Clean Coal to put test plant at former Fort Union site

Jonathan Gallardo Clean Coal Technologies, Inc. has a permanent location for its test facility in Campbell County. Sean Mahoney, the company’s press officer, said the University of Wyoming is working with the company to get the test plant up and running at the former Fort Union mine site as soon as possible. The site is northeast of Gillette off Garner Lake Road. “We had a lot of boxes to check in order to ensure maximum return,” said Aiden Neary, the company’s COO and CFO. “This particular location, we filled each box.” The site’s proximity to Gillette, as well as the fact that it already had some infrastructure in place, made it the ideal location, Neary said. Now the company is seeking the necessary permits through the state Department of Environmental Quality. “We’ve met with them already, and we needed to finalize and secure the location before the actual application,” he said. “They’re very aware of what we’re doing and what our plans are.” The company’s technology reduces the moisture in coal, leaving the mineral stable and safe to handle. Along with producing more energy than untreated coal, the refined Clean Coal product also produces fewer harmful emissions when burned, including carbon dioxide. Clean Coal will facilitate the advanced research work being done in partnership with UW to assess the the technology’s ability to access the valuable byproducts from coal. It expects this will produce a separate and important revenue stream for Powder River Basin coal. The Fort Union site is turning into a hot spot for carbon innovation. It is home to Atlas Carbon and also has been pegged...

Clean Coal set to make Wyoming move

Development of a Clean Coal Technologies Inc. research plant and commercial production facility in the Powder River Basin will begin in the New Year at the former Two Elk property southeast of Wright. Robin Eves, Clean Coal’s CEO, announced during a teleconference Thursday morning that the company’s test facility at the AES Shady Point coal-fired power plant near Tulsa, Oklahoma, has completed its testing there and is being “mothballed” for a move to Wyoming. It should arrive about the end of January. He added that a commercial facility capable of processing 30 tons of coal an hour also will be located near Gillette, which the News Record later confirmed with the company to be the former Two Elk site. He said the company has been working with Wyoming New Power and Piper Jaffray to build the commercial plant, along with some fast-moving negotiations with potential customers in India, Indonesia and Australia. “The (test) plant has been upgraded to operate at a much higher level than before,” he said, adding that the byproducts of refining coal “have huge value, and our technology has the capability of acting as a coal refinery, which has significant value around the world.” Clean Coal’s process reduces the moisture in coal in a way that leaves the mineral stable and safe to handle. Along with producing more energy than untreated coal, the refined product also produces fewer harmful emissions when burned, including carbon dioxide. Also providing significant value to Clean Coal Technologies is a recently announced partnership with the University of Wyoming, Eves said. That agreement, announced in October, will see the university “help perfect...
Clean Coal Test Plant Coming To Gillette

Clean Coal Test Plant Coming To Gillette

(Gillette, Wyo.) A new clean coal technology is heading towards its next big developmental step right here in Gillette. Clean Coal Technologies announced this week their intention to move a test plant from Oklahoma to the Gillette area sometime next month. “This is really good news,” said Energy Capital Economic Development CEO Phil Christopherson. Christopherson said Energy Capital has been helping the company facilitate the move for the past year. Cleaner The technology being tested converts raw coal into a cleaner-burning, more efficient fuel that burns hotter. The company’s end product reduces about 90 percent of chemical pollutants from the coal emissions. It began running coal through its test facility in Oklahoma in Dec. 2015. “The eyes of the coal and power industries are focused on our plant in Oklahoma, and we are confident that after all these years we are about to deliver an extraordinary technology to the market,” Clean Coal Technologies President and CEO Robin Eves said in a press release when the Oklahoma test facility began running coal. The company signed a memorandum of understanding last week with the University of Wyoming to help develop the technology towards the goal of commercializing the end product. Richard Horner, director special projects and emerging technology within the School of Energy Resources, said the technology does not impact carbon dioxide emissions to any meaningful degree. It does produce a coal product that burns much more efficiently than raw coal, which would have a marginal reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, Horner said, but the products value is the other environmental improvements it provides. “We’re producing a solid coal product that...

Coal test plant coming to Wyoming in November

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — A company that is developing a process to produce cleaner burning coal plans to begin work next month on establishing a test plant in northeast Wyoming, a company official said. Robin Eves, CEO of Clean Coal Technologies Inc., said his company is close to starting the commercial designs of the coal refining process it has been working on for more than a decade. Along with producing more energy than untreated coal, the refined coal product also produces fewer harmful emissions when burned, including carbon dioxide, the company said. The company will use coal from the Powder River Basin in northeast Wyoming in the new test plant. A location of the test plant will be announced soon, Eves told the Gillette News Record in an email. Through CCTI’s proprietary process, coal is treated in a way that extracts much of its moisture, which makes it lighter. While dehydrating coal isn’t a new idea, being able to do it in a way that the coal remains stable is, said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology with the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources. “It’s one thing taking the moisture out of coal, but if you do not consume that de-watered coal pretty quickly, you have spontaneous combustion problems,” Horner said. “What CCTI has done, which makes it intriguing, is that they’ve taken volatiles out of the coal together with the water, which improves the BTU value. Then, they’re taking those volatiles and spraying it back on the coal, which stabilizes it. That’s quite original.” Horner said that UW receives proposals for about three...

Coal test plant coming to PRB in Nov.

CEO says coal process ‘seriously needs to go to the next level’ After more than a decade of research and testing and about $20 million spent, Clean Coal Technologies Inc. is close to entering the final stages of developing a refining process company executives say could be the next big thing for thermal coal. “We are very close to starting the commercial designs and already have two licenses and will be seeking to sell further licenses over the next few months to the consumer nations,” said Clean Coal President and CEO Robin Eves about how close CCTI is to bringing its process to market, using Powder River Basin coal. “We hope to have the first commercial module producing (treated) PRB coal for export within 18 months.” Part of that process includes moving the company’s test plant from Oklahoma to a soon-to-be-announced location in the Gillette area, which will happen sometime next month, Eves said. “We will commence the move in November and will be making an announcement about the location shortly,” he said in an email to the News Record. “There are two short-listed.” Through CCTI’s proprietary process, coal is treated in a way that extracts much of its moisture, which makes it lighter. On tests using coal from the PRB, it’s also been found to reduce harmful emissions when burned and to produce more energy. While dehydrating coal isn’t a new idea, being able to do it in a way that the coal remains stable is, said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology with the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources. That’s why UW...