Coal test plant coming to PRB in Nov.

CEO says coal process ‘seriously needs to go to the next level’ After more than a decade of research and testing and about $20 million spent, Clean Coal Technologies Inc. is close to entering the final stages of developing a refining process company executives say could be the next big thing for thermal coal. “We are very close to starting the commercial designs and already have two licenses and will be seeking to sell further licenses over the next few months to the consumer nations,” said Clean Coal President and CEO Robin Eves about how close CCTI is to bringing its process to market, using Powder River Basin coal. “We hope to have the first commercial module producing (treated) PRB coal for export within 18 months.” Part of that process includes moving the company’s test plant from Oklahoma to a soon-to-be-announced location in the Gillette area, which will happen sometime next month, Eves said. “We will commence the move in November and will be making an announcement about the location shortly,” he said in an email to the News Record. “There are two short-listed.” Through CCTI’s proprietary process, coal is treated in a way that extracts much of its moisture, which makes it lighter. On tests using coal from the PRB, it’s also been found to reduce harmful emissions when burned and to produce more energy. While dehydrating coal isn’t a new idea, being able to do it in a way that the coal remains stable is, said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology with the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources. That’s why UW...

UW Partners With New York-Based Clean Coal Firm

After about an eight-month process of discussion and negotiation, the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources solidified a relationship with a New York-based clean-coal company this week. Clean Coal Technologies Incorporated, or CCTI, has developed technologies focused on making coal cleaner. UW hopes to work with them to help develop their products and make them more commercially viable. CCTI has several patented technologies, including one called Pristine-M that works to reduce the moisture content of coal, allowing for more volatile compounds to be added. By increasing the BTU, the traditional unit of measuring heat, CCTI is allowing the coal to burn more efficiently. The company hopes to use this technology to make typical coal more attractive to international markets. Aiden Neary, COO, CFO, and Director of CCTI, said UW offers many new opportunities for them — especially in terms of research and development. For instance, “looking at ways of improving the efficiency of our technology, looking at ideas regarding the products that you can derive from coal using our technology.” UW also provides connections with foreign markets, like Japan and Taiwan, while at the same time taking advantage of Wyoming’s Powder River Basin coal. “We’re looking to actually use our technology for beneficiating Powder River Basin coal to the point where it will actually be more attractive on the global stage from an export perspective into places like India, Japan, and Taiwan,” Neary said. CCTI also has a relationship with Wyoming New Energy, which is planning to build a two million ton coal mine in the Powder River Basin. CCTI plans to begin building a commercial facility in...

CCTC making strides forward with coal beneficiation technology

Coal Technologies, Inc., a clean-energy company using patented technology to convert run of mine coal into a cleaner burning and more efficient fuel, has signed an MoU with the School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming. The focus of the MoU is to further develop the performance and commercial potential of CCTI’s groundbreaking coal beneficiation technology. “Developing this important technical relationship with the School of Energy Resources, University of Wyoming is a very significant and deliberate step for our company and will allow us to confidently further develop the wide-ranging potential and prospects for our patented and proven coal beneficiation technologies” said CEO Robin Eves. “The University – through its Carbon Engineering Initiative — is sharply focused on advantaging and maximising the potential of Wyoming mineral resources especially coal, both domestically and overseas, and our technology fits very well in Wyoming actualising their strategies,” added Eves. “With one of CCTI’s top priorities being to beneficiate Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, the synergies achievable from joining hands with the School of Energy Resources are compelling for us.” Richard Horner, Director Special Projects and Emerging Technology, within the School of Energy Resources, said: “The CCTI technology is proven at pre-commercial scale in the field and is a prime technology for us to investigate and support its development. We view the CCTI technology as an exciting and serious candidate that might be deployed to improve the competitiveness of Wyoming coal in existing markets and to support the development of new market opportunities too.” Horner added: “There are proprietary features of the CCTI technology which have scope to be incorporated into our ‘coal...

Company partners with UW to pursue clean-coal technology

Calling the technology a “potential breakthrough” in treating and marketing Wyoming coal, the University of Wyoming is partnering with Clean Coal Technologies Inc. (CCTI) to develop the company’s patented coal refining technology. Clean Coal’s process is being tested at an Oklahoma coal-fired power plant with plans to move the test plant to the Powder River Basin. It reduces the moisture in coal in a way that leaves the mineral stable and safe to handle. Along with producing more energy than untreated coal, the refined Clean Coal product also produces fewer harmful emissions when burned, including carbon dioxide. If the testing proves sound and Clean Coal can market its treated coal, it would be “a potential breakthrough technology for benefiting Wyoming coal and creating new market opportunities that can grow demand,” said Richard Horner, director of special projects and emerging technology for UW’s School of Energy Resources, in a press release announcing the agreement. The CCTI process has potential to enhance research already being done by the university, Horner said. “There are proprietary features of the CCTI technology that have scope to be incorporated into our ‘coal refinery’ concept, which we have been working on now for over two years,” he said. “Different technology platforms can be linked and leveraged to make wide-ranging fuels, materials and chemical products while producing minimum waste or environmental hazard.” Clean Coal has been operating a multi-million dollar test facility at a coal plant in Oklahoma and has said the next step is to move that facility to the Powder River Basin, where the company also has committed to building a commercial production plant. “CCTI...

Midtown might soon be coal country

Clean Coal Technologies Inc. says it has what it takes to make Donald Trump’s favorite fuel cleaner and more efficient. Madison Avenue may seem like an unlikely home for a coal company. But in recent months energy executives from as far aeld as Wyoming, China, India and Russia have been visiting the Midtown office of Clean Coal Technologies Inc. to discuss the firm’s methods for making dirty coal a more efficient fuel. Founded in 2007 through a merger with another coal technology company, CCTI once traded at more than $70 a share when speculators thought clean-coal technology would soon come to fruition. It is now a penny stock, has no revenue and has just two full-time employees: a chief executive and a chief financial officer. But it does have patents. The company’s technology can remove sulfur, moisture, hydrocarbons and other volatile matter from coal, allowing it to burn hotter and more efficiently. CCTI started in Florida, but in 2010 its CEO, Robin Eves, relocated to a shared space on Madison Avenue to be closer to investors and leverage the city’s status as an international crossroads.The strategy worked. Coal companies from India and Indonesia have since invested more than $6 million, allowing CCTI to begin building a test plant in Oklahoma. Denver-based Black Diamond Holdings and other investors, including a large Manhattan-based fund, have added $9 million since 2015. Then came President Donald Trump. “In January the world changed,” said Eves, who spent more than 30 years in the oil industry. “We got a call from Washington: ‘We need your technology.’” The Department of Energy has begun a review of...