Recent Trends in the Energy Industry will Contribute Significant to Growth of the Clean Coal Technology Market

Coal remains an important source of energy for the world and the demand is growing rapidly in many developing countries as they enjoy long-overdue economic growth. Over the 50 years from 2000 to 2050, demand might double to exceed 7000 million tonnes of coal equivalent and so account for almost 30% of the world’s primarily energy supply, up from todays 25%.

Management letter to the Shareholders Recapping 2018

2018 was an excellent year for the global coal industry – a year that saw increased prices, increased production and, most importantly increased global demand, and it was, in many ways, a very good year for CCTI. After performing initial tests successfully, 2018 saw the Test Plant relocated from Oklahoma to it’s permanent location in the heart of the Powder River Basin, ground zero in Coal Country, and a site where CCTI will have total jurisdiction over the plant and all future testing which will include coals from all over the world. This is a very important and fundamental step in the development and roll-out of our Pristine technology. While the plant was in Oklahoma we were able to perform many critical proof-of-concept stages to our development, however, we were restricted to testing only PRB Coal and were subject to all the rules and regulations imposed by the Power Station where we operated. This severely restricted what CCTI could do with the plant and the testing which consistently added time and costs to our progress. In 2018 we cemented the very important relationship with the Energy Research Division of Wyoming University, one of the most highly regarded Energy Research Teams in the global coal industry. The University is committed to ensuring that CCTI’s technologies reach that global coal industry with the most comprehensive capabilities and credibility possible. They have and continue to invest substantial amounts of time and money to support our technology. Their team has spent the better part of 2018 coordinating closely with the engineers at Kiewit to perfect and enhance the design and engineering for the...

The carbon conundrum: Campbell County at center of push for coal innovation

What a difference a decade makes. In the electricity production industry, coal was not only king 10 short years ago, it was the conquering emperor, and the Powder River Basin was its seat of power. The PRB saw a record year of production in 2008 when it mined and shipped more than 446 million tons of coal and supplied about 50 percent of all the coal burned to produce electricity in the United States. And as with any empire, the focus of the local energy industry was holding and increasing that power and not so much on the future line of succession. To that end, the nation’s largest coal producers assumed billions of dollars of debt in acquisitions. Fast-forward a decade dominated by federal regulation and a global population shifting more toward an anti-fossil fuels philosophy and the crash has been hard. Three of the world’s — and Powder River Basin’s — largest coal producers filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization. The basin has lost thousands of direct and indirect coal industry jobs, and the PRB has seen its share of energy generation plummet from 50 percent to about 30 percent. The numbers tell the story. From that high of 446.5 million tons of coal produced in 2008, the Powder River Basin was down 36 percent by 2016 at 287 million tons and 32 percent in 2017 at 305 million tons produced. And as much as the debate over climate change and global warming has impacted coal-generated electricity in the U.S. and abroad, it’s also created a shift in focus for coal and carbon. While thermal coal will continue...

Could technology open doors to a cleaner-burning future for coal?

Clean Coal Technologies and the University of Wyoming are collaborating on a cleaner, more efficient way for the US and the world to produce and consume coal The term ‘clean coal’ has taken on various definitions over the years and has grown to encapsulate several ideas to better coal’s environmental impact. At the heart of all of these solutions is the desire to reduce coal pollution, typically by recapturing carbon released as the product is utilised, or similar. For many, the idea of coal as a dirty word is changing. Read the full...

The Future of Technologically Enhanced Coal

Conservative estimates suggest that over 1 billion people globally do not have access to electricity. And one thing that can be said with virtual certainty about those invisible townspeople is that not one person reading this article is one of them. It is time to face facts on coal and recognise the continued benefits it provides across the globe. Coal is the oldest and most reliable source of energy in the world, with the rst US coal power plant built in the 1880s. It has been the driver behind industrial revolutions and has provided energy to billions of people and, as a result, improved the quality of life across the world. Throughout the Western world, access to electricity is not only expected, it is demanded and viewed upon as a right. However, that is not the case across most of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, in many of those regions, it is a scarce luxury. Download full article here World Coal...